Ezra Miller Attempts Career Rehab to Salvage 'The Flash'

Ezra Miller Attempts Career Rehab to Salvage ‘The Flash’

Can Ezra Miller rehabilitate their career and their public image after two years of nearly non-stop scandal? That’s the $200 million dollar question for Warner Bros., as the studio still eyes a 2023 summer release date for The Flash. After multiple arrests and claims of harassment, disorderly conduct, burglary, abuse and grooming, Warner Bros. was considering dropping Miller from future DC films and recasting the role of Barry Allen/The Flash.

Last week, Miller issued a public apology, saying “Having recently gone through a time of intense crisis, I now understand that I am suffering complex mental health issues and have begun ongoing treatment. I want to apologize to everyone that I have alarmed and upset with my past behaviour. I am committed to doing the necessary work to get back to a healthy, safe and productive stage in my life.”

Miller has also met with executives Michael De Luca and Pamela Abdy at Warner Bros. Discovery (along with their agent Scott Metzger) to apologize for all the bad press and to formulate a plan to promote the film and potentially stay in the role. Apparently Miller was jolted out of their downward spiral when they heard that the film may be shelved or that they may be fired. An unnamed source said of Miller, “They care about The Flash. It’s one of their favorite characters to play.”

Of course, this wouldn’t be the first time that an actor staged a comeback after personal troubles and controversy. Most of us remember that before Robert Downey Jr. was Iron Man, he suffered serious substance abuse issues and even served jail time. But an addiction isn’t the same as an allegedly abusive crime spree involving minors, and Miller may not be able to redeem themselves in time for audiences to care. However, plenty of allegedly abusive and “cancelled” stars have found redemption (in the business at least), from Mel Gibson to James Franco to Johnny Depp to Shia LaBeouf. Hollywood is all too forgiving of stars (especially white men and male-presenting folks) behaving badly (Miller identifies as non-binary and uses they/them pronouns).

The question remains: is Miller’s career salvageable, and should it be? And what of The Flash, which stars Miller but is also the result of tireless work from hundreds of individuals? There needs to be accountability for Miller’s behavior and justice for their victims. But Hollywood is rarely interested in accountability or justice.

Many took to social media to call out the double standard of Miller’s treatment, and to question their motives, especially in light of the Batgirl cancel.

(via The Hollywood Reporterfeatured image: Warner Bros.)

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